December 3, 2008

How to Share the Vision and the Plan with a Business-Building Community

published this at 8:38 am

Goals, Dreams, Visions, and Plans

Raising a barn is a spectacular goal. Getting a community to help makes it easier and harder. It’s important not to confuse goals with dreams.

A goal without a plan is just a wish.
Antoine de Saint-Exupery,
author of The Little Prince, said that.

Char Polanosky explains what that means.

To raise a barn or build a business with a community is a social collaboration. It competes with all of the other wonderful and pressing things in their lives. To capture their time and attention, we have to offer something that is smart, compelling, and easily fit into their lives — irresistible.

Share the Vision and the Plan

When the time comes to build, we’re not going to find a community who magically knows what to build and where to put their skills to work. A critical stage in social leadership is being ready for the community when they’re ready to help.

We have to be able to explain — what we’re building and what roles they might play.

Share the Vision

We gotta know the vision before we can share it. The vision has to be clear from the minute they arrive. We need to be able to articulate

Seeing the vision gives a community a reason to do the work.

Share the Plan

We gotta have a plan before the work can start. The value of the work also needs to be shiningly apparent. We need to be able to communicate without hesitation a clear business plan that offers:

Knowing the plan offers security that the work will be time well spent.

The vision and the plan let the community see what we will be creating. The vision and the plan give us the confidence on which a community can plant their trust, energy, thought, and emotion. On the vision and the plan, we align our ideas and ideals — we agree on the work to be done.

Antoine de Saint-Exupery also said,
Your task is not to foresee the future, but to enable it.


Have you ever helped someone build a dream? What did you need before you invested?

–ME “Liz” Strauss
Want to build barn? Work with Liz!!
Image: NASA Image Exchange

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Filed under Marketing /Sales / Social Media, Successful Blog | 20 Comments »


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20 Comments to “How to Share the Vision and the Plan with a Business-Building Community”

  1. December 3rd, 2008 at 9:49 am
    Adam said

    These last three posts were exactly what I needed to read. Liz, thank you for making these things suddenly and finally obvious to me. What good is a vision without a plan, and why not enlist the willing help of community? We’ve seen it through out the entire history of society, so why should Web 2.0 21st century living be any different?

  2. December 3rd, 2008 at 12:42 pm
    Richard Reeve said

    TRUST.

  3. December 3rd, 2008 at 1:26 pm
    John said

    Liz,

    I need at least two “intuitive indicators”:

    I need to be able to say to myself: “This person will become a mentor to me! I have a lot to give, AND a lot to gain through this experience. We will grow together”

    Over ten years ago, I helped a friend start a media company. When first met, I intuitively sensed that he would be a mentor to me.

    The second “intuitive indicator” for me is feeling that “This person is doing something right, good and just!”

    John

  4. December 3rd, 2008 at 4:12 pm
    Char said

    Liz – To this day that is one of my all time favorite sayings. It is so simple but so true.

  5. December 3rd, 2008 at 4:28 pm
    Todd Smith said

    Thanks, Liz. Every post is making this idea clearer for me. Thanks.

    Now I’m thinking, how can I do this on a small scale in my own business? I’m thinking, what can I do that will be useful to those who participate, and will also be useful to my business? I see what you mean… you gotta really think.

  6. December 3rd, 2008 at 6:43 pm
    ATLANTA WEDDING PHOTOGRAPHER said

    a plan put on paper and let everyone know about it who can help. This creates the reality of doing it. You can’t ignore it (well, it’s difficult to do when it you have to let people down to do it). I have often created an idea and got people on board but did not execute it. It left me feeling disappointed in myself b/c the next time i asked they are going to be hesitant in coming along. The leader must be determined to do it with or with out support and but be disciplined to keep the motivation and the support from the crowd. thanks liz.

  7. December 3rd, 2008 at 6:48 pm
    ME Liz Strauss said

    Hey Adam,
    So nice to see you here. Glad to know that these posts are hitting the sweet spot for you. Yeah, that’s just what I mean. I knew we connected when we talked. Like minds.

  8. December 3rd, 2008 at 6:49 pm
    ME Liz Strauss said

    Me too, Richard.

  9. December 3rd, 2008 at 6:50 pm
    ME Liz Strauss said

    John,
    I see that in everything you do on the internet. You live your values. That’s so inspiring. It would bring a community right up to any project you’d ask for help with.

  10. December 3rd, 2008 at 6:50 pm
    ME Liz Strauss said

    I know, Char.
    I was so smiling at you as I re-read that post you wrote.

  11. December 3rd, 2008 at 6:51 pm
    ME Liz Strauss said

    Todd,
    Once you get used to looking at things from every side of the table the table gets round. :)

  12. December 3rd, 2008 at 6:52 pm
    ME Liz Strauss said

    Altanta Wedding Photographer,
    Now you know why I’m writing about it. :)

  13. December 3rd, 2008 at 9:37 pm
    Jannie said

    Boy, do I have a plan! And I’m so excited.

  14. December 5th, 2008 at 5:18 am
    You can’t make money sitting on your ass said

    [...] of dedication to commit to a blogging schedule and stick to it.   It’s one thing to have a business vision – it’s another to follow through and make it a [...]

  15. December 5th, 2008 at 5:43 am
    Andrew said

    Liz,

    In my view, the steps you mention above sound like a common sense approach toward any new project, particularly those with a considerable degree of scope.

    Let me pick up on one point.

    You mentioned the importance of not confusing goals with dreams. In my view, dreams are two different concepts, both of which have value and both of which are essential for success in any area of life.

    Take your barn example. Your dream is what your vision of what will occur when the barn will be complete – people singing, dancing and having a good time.

    Dreams are the reason, the inspiration, behind any project of significant scope.

    Goals, in my view are a series of short, medium and long term measurable targets which must be reached if the dream is to be realized. Unlike dreams, which provide inspiration, goals provide specific road maps and focus points by which the project can be guided.

  16. December 5th, 2008 at 8:30 am
    John said

    Liz,

    Thanks for the kudos. I wish I could frame my SOB Award… do you have a hi-res image?

    Collaboration for social good has been leveraged exponentially with social media. I am slowly but surely building relationships with like-minded folks. I envision a project naturally blossoming from those relationships.

    John

  17. December 6th, 2008 at 9:17 pm
    ME Liz Strauss said

    Hi Andrew!
    I have lots of room for just the kind of dreams you describe and the way you describe them suits me too. The inspiration of a dream needs to be grounded in goals for the dream to take hold and grow. Thank you for saying it far better than I ever could. :)

  18. December 6th, 2008 at 9:24 pm
    ME Liz Strauss said

    John,
    I’ll send you the highest res file I have. The original from the designer. I’m not sure it will do the trick.

    I think you’re making relationships a lot faster and having a huger impact than you might realize. :)

  19. December 6th, 2008 at 9:54 pm
    John Haydon said

    Thanks, Liz.

    I can see your eyebrows, but you can’t see mine…

    John

  20. March 18th, 2009 at 9:45 am
    » Blog Archive » Family Pride Workshop said

    [...] most successful businesses have solid leadership who work toward a shared vision. When businesses have partners they work toward a shared VISION.  I repeat a shared VISION. The [...]

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